Category Archives: Technology

MSFC, PFC and DFC on Cisco 6500 series

If you are in routing and switching industry, it’s almost impossible not to hear words like MSFC, PFC and DFC in relation with Cisco Catalyst 6500 series, chassis, supervisor and modules. If you didn’t yet, you’re not almost there, working with large enterprise environments.

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[Solution] Speed / Duplex auto-negotiation fails between Cisco and Tandberg

In the last weeks I was working closely with a Cisco Telepresence team to identify a issue regarding poor performance of the video systems. We did find pretty quickly the issue as being the failure of auto-negotiation of Speed and Duplex on the connection between Cisco switch port and Tandberg endpoint devices.

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Juniper, first steps after power-on the device

As you know from my previous posts, I’m trying to find time to gain some Juniper knowledge. During this “quest” I will add here some basic things about how to start working with Juniper devices. For now I know only the basics of Juniper configuration, but I hope that soon you’ll find here some more challenging scenarios.

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TCP Slow Start And Wan Optimization Compression

This video looks like a good joke, but to be honest it explain in the most simple way how TCP Slow Start and Wan Optimization work. If you have problems explaining networks concepts, than for sure when somebody ask you about TCP Slow Start and Wan Optimization, you’ll remember the two guys running with oranges.

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Virtual WAN Optimization – Blue Coat presentation

Chris Webber from Blue Coat Systems describe the concept of virtualing WAN Optimization and WAN Acceleration systems. Of course that, since Blue Coat Systems is involved, you can consider this video presentation a little bit of marketing strategy, but if you think to this subject, all companies out there do the same. It’s somehow normal.

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Manage VirtualBox over Web Interface

A while ago, I wrote an article about How to integrate GNS3 with VirtualBox in which I have shown how you can easily create a guest machine with its own Operating System and attach it with GNS3.  Everything is working fine when you have the system in front of you, and if you have a graphical interface, but what if you have a powerful server somewhere and you want to use it for virtualization with VirtualBox? Of course, you can use CLI to manage VirtualBox, create new machines, tune settings and so on, but it’s more likely to you would like to see something graphic and use the point and click method to achieve results.

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New XenServer (Midnight Ride beta) is here!

Citrix launched today the new XenServer with code name Midnight Ride. This version is still a beta one and Citrix decided to make it available for download and testing through it’s Beta Program.  As a participant in the Beta Program, you’ll play a critical role in helping the XenServer product team develop and deliver the next edition of the product and provide valuable insight for enhancements in future releases.
This new version of XenServer—the industry’s only fully capable, free virtual infrastructure solution—and Essentials for XenServer boasts many significant enhancements, including:

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Cisco: Frame-Relay back-to-back routers in simple steps

In one of my earlier posts I have presented how to connect 3 routers in a Hub and Spoke Frame-Relay topology. Now I want to show you how to connect 2 routers back to back, in a Frame Relay topology. With a back to back connection and without any FR switch, things are a little bit different than in the Hub and Spooke topology.

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Cisco: How to configure Frame-Relay Hub and Spoke in simple steps

Some days ago, during my preparation for CCIE RS I had to configure Frame-Relay Hub and Spoke environment. Since I already did it, I said that is good to have it here also, maybe somebody will find it useful. Even if it sounds quite complicate as title, FR hub and spoke. This post assume that you are somehow familiar with Frame-Relay concept and you know basic stuff. If you need to refresh your knowledge there is good topic about Frame-Relay on Ciscopress page.

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Cisco: Quick IOS check in 4 simple steps

This post is rather for the beginners in Cisco’s world than for advance professionals, but still I encounter situation when IOS image was corrupted even if it was uploaded to the device by a network guru. Why? It’s quite simple! Because you can be the master of the Cisco networking,  but still sometime you cannot control the device behavior or the transport of the packets to destination.

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Cisco: OSPFv3 point-to-point network configuration

In the previous post I explained some basic stuff about IPv6 and how to configure IPv6 addresses on Cisco’s interfaces. Following this subject, I want to explain now how you can configure unicast dynamic routing protocols for IPv6 networks. The same as IPv4, the v6 generation of IP addresses supports routing protocol like OSPF, RIP and EIGRP, just that their names has been adapted to the v6 generation meaning OSPFv3, RIPng and EIGRP for IPv6.

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Cisco: IPv6 basics and configuration how-to

Today, I had to deal with IPv6 configuration for my CCIE preparation and I said to write a small tutorial about IPv6 for it’s basic stuff. First of all IPv6 is not more complicated that IPv4, it just look like it is. Second, and this is my personal opinion, I think that as long as IPv4 will be on the market and things like NAT can overcome the problem of  IP addresses being exhausted, IPv6 will not be implemented on a large scale. Let’s be honest, I’m more OK in a discussion saying that I had a problem with the IP address 192.168.100.100 than to say 2001:128:1F:633:207:85FF:FE80:71B8 (IPv6).

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